5 Tips for Relocating Your Photography BusinessI’m knee-deep in what seems like endless to-do lists for the next two months. We’re moving. 5 hours away from the Denver area to one of the most remote spots in the state. It’s a small town. When I say small. I mean small. I know it can be hard to comprehend, but let me tell you…the only grocery store is also an Ace Hardware. At first my thought was, “well at least there’s a grocery store.” However, after my first visit to the grocery store…I’m preparing to shop for groceries at the nearest town, which is an hour away and also in Utah (it’s also still ridiculously small). The produce section had about one of a handful of veggies. You may have been able to get a small broccoli crown for $5 each. There was only one on sale at the time I was there.

Basically…it’s small. I think the thing I’m most sad about is no movie theater. I’ve been a movie-goer for as long as I can remember. The nearest towns to where we’ll be going are all about an hour and a half away. They’re still pretty small too. I’m moving at the end of this August and the biggest question I’ve received is, “Oh no! What will you do about your business?!” Then they quickly answer their own question and say, “Oh well you can just shoot weddings there.” Um yeah…because a town of 2,000 people without a real grocery store is such a hot spot for weddings.

So here are a few things I’m learning along the way. This will be the first time I’ve moved my business a long distance and hopefully I can follow up this post with more info as I go through it all.

Raise your prices right away.

As soon as I knew we were relocating I raised my prices. I still plan on shooting anywhere in the state of Colorado. That means my plan is to simply increase my pricing to include the cost of travel for all weddings inside state lines. That way pricing is simple and easy for people to understand. I did this a couple months ago when we got news of the move and it hasn’t stopped booking at all. Since I’m lucky enough to still be in driving distance of where I photograph a lot of weddings it may seem like much hasn’t changed, but it is a lot more difficult to balance double header weekends if they have different locations, find a place for the dogs and do everything else.

Change your locations online.

I’ll be moving to the “Western Slope” as we like to call it in Colorado. So it gives me a whole new list of mountain towns and wedding locations I can incorporate into my website wording. By listing those locations on my website, I’m opening up my search engine optimization (SEO) so I have a better chance of being found in a Google search for new locations. Make it clear to readers where you’re at and where you’ll be available. If you’re living in a small town one of the best things you can do is use nearby larger towns to anchor your locations to a larger audience. You might have to step out of your comfort zone and be willing to travel too. I’m still keeping my Denver stuff on my website so I can shoot anywhere. I’ll just make my audience larger by expanding to all new towns.

Be OCD about planning.

This. So much this. I can’t even tell you. I run 4 businesses so photography is just one of them. While the other ones aren’t location sensitive, the wedding photography is. Between doing most of the paperwork and packing myself and everything else I will admit I’m totally overwhelmed. Knowing that I still have to photograph about 15 weddings in the month before and after I move means that I have to become a time management goddess. I sat down with a calendar and wrote down which days I have weddings and where they are. Then I had to plan for the first month after I move where I get to drive back down to Denver every weekend for double (and triple) header weddings. So I marked off the weddings, the driving days and looked at what was left. Just enough time to keep up on editing. I have a very tight calendar with days marked off for packing now too. The best thing you can do so you don’t lose momentum or fall behind on editing for your clients is to plan which days you’re going to do it all – and then STICK TO IT.

Decide how to let your clients know.

I’m not one for announcing price changes or big things on social media. I don’t feel its necessary, but I understand why other business owners do. I just made my price change and started handing out those prices to all my inquiries after that date. I also won’t be making a big announcement about moving in the midst of one of the busiest parts of wedding season either. No need to panic my clients. I’m just going to keep on with how things are going because I know I’ve got my plan, my strict schedule and that I’ve got this. Moving isn’t allowed to be an excuse for neglecting my clients.

Prioritize.

With as many projects and businesses as I’ve got going on prioritizing is key. There are big things I’ve been wanting to work on, but I’m learning they have to wait. Right now my priority is to simply stay on top of things for my clients first and foremost. My to-do list for all businesses is left to blogging, social media, and editing. With a bit of client communication, wedding timeline building and things like that thrown in. Updating my website, making new online classes, and any other big projects are not happening. During the move itself I’m just going to keep up with the bare minimum of things needed to keep the business running and in Winter when wedding season is done and I’m living in the middle of nowhere (with no movie theater to distract me), I’ll have tons of projects and things to work on. It’s important to not burn yourself out and ensure you’ve got your clients and customer service at the top of your list during stressful times. If your clients see you handling things like a boss when they know you’ve got a lot on your plate, they’ll love you even more.

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Carrie Swails

I’m a serial entrepreneur. Owner at Photography Awesomesauce, Rock Your Weird and Made in the Lab and I photograph offbeat weddings. In other words, I’m crazy. I have a birthmark in my armpit, and am a terrible mathematician. What I lack in understanding of complex theories such as Pi (clearly a food item – apple is my favorite) and invisible numbers (if I can’t see them, why should I care?) I make up for in awesomesauce. I believe there is no right way to put the toilet paper on – I’m just happy it’s available. I believe there’s no such thing as a bad fortune in a fortune cookie. I believe we only live life once so we should wear costumes as often as possible. I believe wine is like the force – it has a light side and a dark side and it holds the universe together. I howl with my basset hound every morning, call my brother to beat video game bosses for me, and love eating fried cheese.

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